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Does God Hate Some People? April 23, 2012

Posted by roberttalley in Esau, Genesis, Isaac, Jacob, Malachi, Rebekah, Suffering.
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DOES GOD HATE SOME PEOPLE?
Genesis 25:19-34 with Malachi 1:1-5

The Bible says that God hated Esau. What does that mean? Does God hate any of us? Our hate usually involves a sinful attitude. What is involved in God’s hate?

“Helen Rosevere was a British medical missionary to the Congo during the uprising of the Mau Mau revolutionaries. Though she had gone to the Congo to serve God and to share the gospel, she was personally and brutally…raped, but hung on with her life to a faith in God that refused to be shaken…Recovering from her ordeal in the Congo, Helen wrote a statement that each of us should consider. She wrote a question as though spoken from God’s own mouth: Can you thank Me for trusting you with this experience even if I never tell you why?” (taken from Gripped by the Greatness of God by James McDonald, 2005).

A. There are many things about God’s dealings with us which we do not understand. When we look at life, there are times when God seems good and other times when He seems cruel. We could easily draw the conclusion that we cannot trust Him.

1. We may not understand why answered prayer results in pain (Gen. 25:21-22). Isaac prayed for his wife to bear a child. The couple knew that they were praying according to God’s will; God had promised that the world would be blessed through Isaac’s seed. Abraham had given Isaac everything (Genesis 25:5-9; see also Genesis 17:18) because he was the promised seed and Abraham’s other children were not. God answered Isaac’s prayer but the answer was so painful for Rebekah that she began to question the answer.

How often have we longed for God to answer our prayers and then when he answers them, we are disappointed because the answer brought its own set of problems. God did not have to allow Rebekah to have twins. There needed not to be an Esau. What blessings has God given you that did not work out (from no fault of your own) the way you had hoped?

2. We may not understand why God blesses one and curses another (Gen. 25:23-24). Who decided that Jacob would continue the promised seed instead of the older brother, Esau (Genesis 25:21-23, 29-34; 27:1-17, 27-41; 28:3-4, 10-15)? God. Neither son is presented as particularly spiritual. God, however, laid his hand on Jacob.

Are we then just puppets on God’s string? Certainly not. Our choices may not be capable of changing God’s plan but that does not mean that they are not our choices. James McDonald tells of being “in Indonesia and [getting] to play against a chess master…There were ten [players]…and he played [them] all at the same time.” McDonald writes, “He would walk down the row of boards, crushing each of us with his speed and incredibly insightful moves. In fifteen minutes, we were all out of the game” (taken from Gripped by the Greatness of God by James McDonald, 2005).

3. We may not even recognize God’s blessing (Malachi 1:2-5). Israel was so obsessed with their own problems that they did not recognize that God had blessed them above all other nations, but particularly over Edom, the nation descended from Esau. God’s purposes are too great for us to grasp but it is clear that God wanted Israel to recognize their honored position and live accordingly.

B. Whatever God does, we should be prepared to live according to what He reveals of His ways.

1. What we know God has favored, we should favor (Genesis 25:27-28, 29-34).
a. Is it good when the parents favor one child over another? Is it possible for a parent to love all their children the same? Why or why not?
b. How do you think the children would react to being the favorite? How about not being the favorite?
c. What if one parent loved one child more and the other parent loved another child more?

Obviously we see this as a negative thing, yet Rebekah showed more faith than Isaac. She saw that God had chosen Jacob and she was going to go the way of God. Isaac should have known better, after all, he himself was also the chosen one of God and selected by God over all of his brothers. Yet he allowed his personal desires to get in the way of God’s will.

2. What we know God has commanded; we should do (Malachi 1:6-8). God had favored Israel, destroying Edom and yet they did not honor him but rather gave him what was inferior in their lives.

a. If God is the one who decides things and not you, what should you do? Submit to God’s will, His ways, and His Word.

b. What if you don’t understand or don’t agree with what God has decided? Ask him for mercy (Malachi 1:9) and seek to obey His word (Malachi 2:4-9).

c. What will happen if you fight against God’s chosen ways (Esau would be a good example)? You will be cursed (Malachi 1:14-2:4).

In today’s bulletin we have a synopsis of the life of Fanny Crosby. Fanny wrote a poem at the age of eight:
O what a happy soul am I!
Although I cannot see,
I am resolved that in this world
Contented I will be,
How many blessings I enjoy
That other people don’t!
So weep and sigh because I’m blind,
I cannot, and I won’t.

When it seems that God is frowning on you, you can get closer to God or push back away from Him. There is mercy for those who get closer and only a curse for those who push back. Which path will you follow.

Next Week’s Sermon: Tears of Regret

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